Economic Development InsightsThe Ady Advantage: Strategy Matters

 

AS I SEE IT: Food and Economic Development

One of the interesting stealth trends in economic development is the preponderance of food processing among target industries, especially on the regional or state level. (There also seems to be a preponderance of “foodies” among the E.D. pros, although that may just be a happy coincidence. You know who you are.)In one state in which […]

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AS I SEE IT: Talent Challenges = Talent Opportunities

Everywhere you turn, it seems, we’re being told about the lack of talent. (See my earlier blog about the cause of this: Is it a skills gap or a wage gap?). As economic developers and companies, however, we like to do something about it.Advanced Technology Services, Inc. is what I would describe as a specialized […]

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Study Reveals Striking Shifts in Global Manufacturing Costs over the Past Decade

From The Boston Consulting GroupBCG’s new global manufacturing study was just released. The bottom line was that everything we knew about global cost structures for manufacturing has changed over the past ten years. Mexico and the US are increasing in competitiveness and some of the recent high-fliers like Brazil and China are in decreasing in competitiveness.  […]

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AS I SEE IT: What does Prairie Home Companion have to do with ED?

One of the long-running programs on public radio is Garrison Keillor’s “Prairie Home Companion,” which recounts the day to day activities in fictional   Lake Wobegon. Lake Wobegon is memorably described as a place “where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average.”Now what does “Prairie […]

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AS I SEE IT: Empty Downtown Office Space? Three Things You Can Do Now

I got a call recently from an economic developer looking to “accelerate” their business recruitment efforts. I asked him a few questions about the size of his community (a little over 20,000 people), the available property (a couple of office buildings downtown), and the available workforce (a large IBM customer service is within commuting distance […]

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AS I SEE IT: The Differentiator of Tomorrow

Perhaps you missed the story of Kimball International announcing that it is planning to participate in the State of Indiana’s “shovel ready” program for a 130-acre parcel that it wished to have developed.Here’s the piece that many may have overlooked: Indiana currently has approximately 100 shovel-ready sites.Economic developers, the clue train is passing every day. The […]

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AS I SEE IT: If you have THIS one skill as an ED practitioner, you will always be in high demand

One of the themes this year was that there are traditionally three legs to the economic development stool – business recruitment is just one of them. Business retention/expansion and business start-up are the other two, and for most EDOs, a combination of two or three of these are appropriate.This is a good time to remember […]

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AS I SEE IT: Is it a skills gap or a wage gap?

We’ve all heard it and seen it firsthand among the manufacturing companies we talk to. A remarkable lack of welders. Employees who can’t read an engineering drawing. Employees who don’t show up to work or can’t pass a drug test. And then the counterpoint: that it’s not a skills gap, it’s a wage gap.Back to […]

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AS I SEE IT: ED Professionals are from Mars, Planners are from Venus

Like to learn new things? Are you comfortable getting out of your comfort zone? I encourage all ED professionals to consider attending the American Planning Association’s annual conference in Atlanta (April 26-30). http://www.planning.org/conference/I had the pleasure of speaking at this conference last year, with one of my planning colleagues and we talked about the “blending” […]

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AS I SEE IT: EDOs Should Be “Talent Engines”

While the Wall Street Journal runs an article about how external devices might help humans improve their memory, eyesight, and everything in between, Fortune ran its annual story on the most admired companies in the United States. Their cover story was not on one of the traditional poster children of their ranking (Apple, Google, Amazon, […]

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